women 4 hope

Dedicated to addressing women’s issues.

Posts Tagged ‘healthcare’

Politics: How is the healthcare crisis related to the high cost of healthy foods?

Posted by Catherine Morgan on March 18, 2010

Are healthcare, politics, and the high cost of healthy foods related?

Yes.

Let me start by saying…I am so sick of politics I could throw-up. But that said, this is about much more than politics. It’s about the warped reality we are all living in, from the White House to our local supermarket and fast food joint.

About two weeks ago I read an article comparing the cost of health care to the cost of food. It suggests that the best way to solve the healthcare crisis, is for all consumers to be forced to pay more for healthcare – Because then people would think about the cost before “choosing” certain tests and treatments. What a shocking revelation…Who would have thought (other than the CATO Institute) that the people who can’t afford expensive health care services would “choose” not to have them? Although, I wouldn’t really consider that a choice.

*Read full post at catherine.morgan.com

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Posted in family, food, Health, heart disease, life, lifestyle, news, nutrition, opinion, political, Politics, universal healthcare, Women, women's health | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

A Series of Posts on Breast Cancer from the Avon Breast Cancer Forum

Posted by Catherine Morgan on February 26, 2010

I was honored to be asked to attend the Avon Foundation’s Breast Cancer Forum earlier this week in San Francisco.  And I have so much to share with everyone about all that I learned there.  I decided to do that in a series of posts rather than just one big one.

Here is some of what I’ll be sharing over the next several days…

–  Video interviews with Dr. Laura Esserman on new mammogram recommendations.

–  Video reactions of attendees to Dr. Esserman’s discussion on new mammogram recommendations.

–  Advances in Imaging Technologies to help improve early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer.

–  Is fear of unnecessary biopsies having an impact on early breast cancer detection?

–  Results of survey on the early impact of the new breast cancer screening guidelines.

–  The latest research on Inflammatory Breast Cancer…Signs and symptoms for early diagnosis, new treatment recommendations, understanding why this type of breast cancer can be so deadly.

–  Reaching the medically under-served, uninsured, and under-insured.

–  Nutrition and physical activity in breast cancer.

–  Most effective ways to explain risk factors in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

As I post on these topics, I will also include links to them on this post.

Posted in awareness, breast cancer, Care2, daughters, Health, life, mothers, news, Women, women's health, women's issues | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Study Finds Weight Bias In Healthcare

Posted by Catherine Morgan on January 23, 2010

I came across a pretty disturbing article today…It suggests that doctors are bias against overweight women, to the extent of jeopardizing their health and well-being.  It’s no secret that overweight people are discriminated against in many ways.  But recent studies have found that overweight women are actually being discriminated by their own doctors and health care professionals.  With two out of every three Americans considered to be overweight or obese, this bias could be putting many people at risk.  Could you be one of them?

How serious is the problem?

It begins with the availability of  quality health care.  If you are overweight, you may have a harder time getting health insurance, or be made to pay higher premiums than your thinner counterparts.  And it doesn’t stop there.  You may be paying more, but getting less.  For instance, an overweight woman is more likely to be misdiagnosed or prescribed the wrong dosage of medications.  There is also a greater risk of not detecting cancer early enough for effective treatment.  And, overweight women are also less likely to find a fertility doctor to help them have a child.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in blood pressure, body image, chronic illness, Health, life, lifestyle, news, opinion, weight loss, Women, women blogging, women's health, women's issues | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Breast Cancer Screening Controversy: Are women just too emotional for mammograms before 50?

Posted by Catherine Morgan on November 22, 2009

Unless you’ve been under a rock all week, you have probably heard about the government task force that has recommended new guidelines for breast cancer prevention.  It goes something like this…

If you’re younger than 50 or older than 75, you no longer have to worry your pretty little head about breast cancer, or getting those pesky boob squishing mammograms.

Hallelujah!  I wonder how long it will be before we go back to giving women Valium for chest pain?  Who needs preventative care when it’s not 100% effective anyway?  Hell, just go ahead and give us anti-anxiety meds for all of our ills…I’ll betcha we save a bundle on healthcare costs. Women already outlive men by a bunch of years, maybe this will even things out a bit…Isn’t equality what we’ve been cryin about all these years?

OK, I know, I went a little too far with my analogy.  But seriously, this is what’s going on…

*Read full post at catherine-morgan.com

Posted in BlogHer, breast cancer, cancer, chronic illness, Health, life, mothers, news, opinion, political, thoughts, Women, women blogging, women's health, women's issues, YouTube | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

November is Epilepsy Awareness Month

Posted by Catherine Morgan on November 3, 2009

November is Epilepsy Awareness Month.  I hope this post will provide information and facts about epilepsy, while also showcasing women blogging about life with seizures.

Here are some epilepsy facts from CURE Epilepsy

  • Epilepsy affects over 3 million Americans of all ages – more than multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, and Parkinson’s disease combined. Almost 500 new cases of epilepsy are diagnosed every day in the United States. Epilepsy affects 50,000,000 people worldwide.
  • In two-thirds of patients diagnosed with epilepsy, the cause is unknown.
  • Epilepsy can develop at any age and can be a result of genetics, stroke, head injury, and many other factors.
  • In over thirty percent of patients, seizures cannot be controlled with treatment. Uncontrolled seizures may lead to brain damage and death. Many more have only partial control of their seizures.
  • The severe epilepsy syndromes of childhood can cause developmental delay and brain damage, leading to a lifetime of dependency and continually accruing costs—both medical and societal.
  • It is estimated that up to 50,000 deaths occur annually in the U.S. from status epilepticus (prolonged seizures), Sudden Unexplained Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP), and other seizure-related causes such as drowning and other accidents.
  • The mortality rate among people with epilepsy is two to three times higher than the general population and the risk of sudden death is twenty-four times greater.
  • Recurring seizures are also a burden for those living with brain tumors and other disorders such as cerebral palsy, mental retardation, autism, Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, multiple sclerosis, tuberous sclerosis, and a variety of genetic syndromes.

I found this video on a blog called My 3 Peanuts – It is a very informative video that explains exactly what happens during a seizure.

Understanding Epilepsy…

READ FULL POST AT catherine-morgan.com

Posted in awareness, bloggers, BlogHer, children, chronic illness, family, Health, life, news, parenting, teens, Women, women blogging, women's health, women's issues, YouTube | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Do the benefits of anti-depressants outweigh the risks?

Posted by Catherine Morgan on October 28, 2009

Anti-depressants have been in the news a lot recently.  There are new questions about anti-depressant use and the risk of suicide.  Questions about why anti-depressant use seems to be on the rise.  Questions about the risks of using anti-depressants during pregnancy.  And questions about the safety of using anti-depressants in adolescence.  Unfortunately, there are more questions than answers.

For me, these types of questions boil down to…Do the benefits outweigh the risks? And there is no right or wrong answer, I believe these questions need to be addressed on a case by case basis.

As with everything in life – Knowledge is power.  So in this post we will take a look at the latest news surrounding anti-depressant use, as well as links to information on diagnosis and treatment of depression.

READ FULL POST AT catherine-morgan.com

Posted in awareness, chronic illness, depression, Health, life, news, Women, women's health | Tagged: , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Breast Cancer Awareness: What if you can’t afford a mammogram?

Posted by Catherine Morgan on October 3, 2009

I’m sure you’ve heard that October is breast cancer awareness month.  The problem with breast cancer awareness is that being aware is only helpful if you can actually do something about it.  And in the case of breast cancer, that something is getting a mammogram.  Sadly, not every woman can afford to get a mammogram.

READ FULL POST AT CATHERINE-MORGAN.COM

Posted in breast cancer, cancer, Health, life, Women, women's health, women's issues | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Royal Pains and Concierge Medicine

Posted by Catherine Morgan on June 26, 2009

Royal Pains: Can Concierge Medicine Coexist With Obama’s Healthcare Plan?

Have you seen the new show Royal Pains?  If so, you are probably now familiar with what a concierge doctor is.  It’s not a bad show, but is concierge (or boutique) healthcare bad for patients?

This is from an episode of The Doctors

Have you ever wished you had your own personal doctor at your beck and call? Now you can. Concierge doctors are gaining popularity, but can the average person afford them? President of Elite Personal Physician Services, Dr. Cheryl BryantBruce, explains that her clients have 24/ 7 direct access to her.

“Whether you get the $100,000 package or the $10,000 package, you will get the same medical care,” Dr. BryantBruce assures. “We have a Hippocratic oath that tells us that is what we are supposed to do.”

It seems to me that if you can afford it, it’s a great way to go.  The trouble is, most people probably can’t afford it.

From Womanist Musings – The Terrible Nightmare of Single Payer Healthcare

The United States has some of the world’s best hospitals, yet millions of U.S. citizens are unable to access their services, making their existence meaningless to large sections of the population. Many die each year due to a lack of insurance and the greatest cause of bankruptcy is unpaid medical bills. Looking from the outside, it is clear that the American Health care system is about profit, whereas the value of a single human life is priceless.

From Doc Gurley

For those of us who don’t live in the rarefied world of “concierge” anything, here’s how a concierge doc works: you, as a doc, sign up people for a fixed monthly amount, then you offer them hand-held service for that monthly payment. Also part of the arrangement is a (sometimes explicit, sometimes assumed) limit on the total number of patients the doc will see – say, 600 people total.

But it’s not just about more and more physicians turning to concierge medicine, it’s about why?

From Chelsey Ledue at Healthcare Finance News

To adapt to market pressures, some physicians are moving to full concierge practices. The model works well for physicians – and for patients who can afford it – but it often disenfranchises those patients who can’t afford or don’t want to move to such a model.

“The way the market is moving we may well create a system where millions of Americans no longer have access to primary care physicians,” said Lipton. “This creates a bit of a paradox as the administration and healthcare leaders are publicly highlighting what an important role PCPs play in providing and coordinating care for Americans.”

From Jennifer Erickson of The Laguna Beach Independent

Some opponents of concierge medicine view the business model as an extra level of bureaucracy atop managed care medical insurance. Dr. Bill Anderson, who runs the Sleepy Hollow urgent care facility downtown, wrote recently in a weekly ad, “if you have a real doctor in a private practice and not a managed care medical plan, you get the same service, minus the frills. Your doctor or an associate is available by phone 24/7 and they coordinate emergency and hospital care when you need it. So what’s the big deal?”

Will concierge medicine help or hurt the millions of uninsured and under-insured in our country?

From Josie Brown at Single Minded Woman – Support Single Payer Healthcare

Last week I got a notice from our insurance carrier that our family policy rate was going up — almost 35% (!!!) — oh, and yeah, it’s time for my college age daughter to get a plan of her own: another $159 above and beyond the increase.

Few kids in college can afford to cover their own health insurance policy. Of course Martin and I will do so until she’s making an income that will do so (forget about a plan from an employer: those are becoming as rare as Ugg boots).

Adding to our cost concerns, our deductible is being raised again, and some benefits (I use that term lightly) are no longer included.

How will this new form of healthcare integrate itself into the Obama healthcare plan?  Does it even want to?

From Mommy Life – Obama and ABC Merge

On the night of June 24, the media and government become one, when ABC turns its programming over to President Obama and White House officials to push government run health care — a move that has ignited an ethical firestorm!

Highlights on the agenda:

ABCNEWS anchor Charlie Gibson will deliver WORLD NEWS from the Blue Room of the White House.

The network plans a primetime special — ‘Prescription for America’ — originating from the East Room, exclude opposing voices on the debate.

Have you checked out the new show Royal Pains?

From Megan’s Minute – The “Royal Pains” of the Hamptons

Did you know there were such things as concierge doctors?

Medical professionals who hang out at ritzy resorts waiting for party-goers to overdose, or slip on the dance floor or crack-up their cars? That’s when a discreet doctor is literally worth his weight in gold.

So…What do you think about concierge medicine?  Will it help or hurt our chances of getting quality and affordable healthcare for everyone?  If you had the money would you prefer to have a concierge doctor?  Let me know your thoughts in comments.

Contributing Editor Catherine Morgan
at Catherine-Morgan.com and Women4Hope

Posted in Health, life, lifestyle, medicine, Women, women blogging, women's health, women's issues | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 5 Comments »